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Took a recent Saturday off and met with family down at Rocky Ford creek to look for crawdads and have a cook-out. The creek was cold and clear…perfect for a hot summer afternoon and looking for crawdads.

Crawdads can be a bit tricky to catch…just ask me and I’ll tell you…I’ll tell you that if I’m lucky, I’ll actually catch one about every 3 years. Fortunately, my kids and other relatives are pretty adept at catching them – I blame my lack of ability on my no-line bifocals (and the fact that I don’t particularly like being pinched.) Although there are a lot of ways to catch crawdads (traps with bacon, nets, etc.), the quickest way is to start looking under rocks……

And if you are lucky, you’ll get your hands on a pretty nice sized one…..

Depending on how many people that plan on eating these little critters determines how long and how far up/down the creek you hunt. Took us (or should I say “everyone else”) a couple of hours to get enough worth messing with. My aunt, who has been cleaning crawdads since she was a kid, has tried for the past 40 years to teach another generation how to “clean” them for cooking. We are hoping that perhaps the 2nd generation is catching on……..

Although I have watched her clean these things for many years, about all I can tell you is that you pull the middle thing on their tail which removes something and then you pinch off the head and legs. (Just writing that gives me the heebie jeebies, so you can understand what I do not partake in the “cleaning of the crawdads.”) After they have been cleaned, powder them with some cornmeal, salt and pepper.

Throw them in a pot of hot vegetable oil (or bacon grease, if you are true affectionado….)

It doesn’t take too long before they start turning that typical shellfish pink when they start cooking……

And while I have issues catching and cleaning crawdads, I have absolutely no problem eating them…..

Bon appetit!

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Goodbye Blackie…you served our family well for almost 10 years. You endured pee, puke and poop from the human and canine varieties. After over 238,000 miles, you just weren’t “cool” enough for us anymore. We traded you in last week for a newer model…and although you didn’t bring much in on the trade, we hope you find a good home somewhere north where your lack of a working air conditioner compressor won’t be a huge factor.

You took us to weddings and funerals. Family vacations to the coast – camping trips to the lake. You endured near misses and not so near misses (and it is interesting that the two minor wrecks you were involved in happened in your own driveway).

You were the dependable one in snow storms – often the only vehicle that could make it down (and more importantly, back up) the hill to the house.

You taught and suffered through 3 kids learning to drive.

And you literally hauled everything from A to Z…..

Antiques
Buyers
Chickens
Dining room table and 4 chairs
Easter bunny and euros
Fans of OU
Gassy children
Hamsters
Inattentive drivers
Junk (or see antiques above)
Kinfolk
Lawn furniture and lizards
Mirrors
Nauseous puppies
Oddities (see antiques and junk above ;-)
Parakeets and puppies and plants
Quarreling children
Real estate signs
Sports equipment (baseball, softball, basketball, tennis, track,
soccer, football)
Toilets (new, of course)
Umpteen groceries
Vacationers
Wheel barrow
Xylophone (really)
Yapping dogs
Zoo bound kids

You will be missed………

Stepped outside a bit ago to check on plant watering and heard a racket up around one of our electric poles…..



I started feeling a little sorry for the mockingbird as it dive-bombed the hawk. And seeing how the hawk apparently had no plans to move from its perch and certainly wasn’t scared of a bird about a tenth it’s size, I figured perhaps a little human intervention would do the trick…..

See ya Mr. Hawk…..
Yours truly,
Ms. Mockingbird

We bought our old house on a hill about 20 years ago. Both of us had grown up in Tulsa in houses built in the typical small lot subdivisions so moving to the country on 10 acres was a big change. But more than that, moving to a hill was an eye opener.
Thunder clouds
The sunrises, sunsets and approaching storms continue to amaze us…..even 20 years later.

And we never get tired of the view……

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